Pictures from my first real visit to Dublin, Ireland where I traveled with Jeritt Kent.


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Here's our Spuddy Buddy Hero Mr Jeritt Kent on the train from Limerick to Dublin. He wasn't feeling
top notch, so I advised him that a steady diet of drinking and girling was in order.


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A view of the Millenium Spike in the heart of Dublin. They built the bottom of it with some type of material
that apparently can't be graffitied. How innovative is that? Necessity IS the mother of invention.


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Here Jeritt walks down the street to our hotel on Temple Bar. I like the Bookmaker sign on the right.


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Looking down Temple from our hotel, the Temple Bar.


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A typical Irish pub, looking very similar to the kinds found in every major city in the world.
In fact, I think I was in The Oliver St John's in Singapore a few years ago. The sense of having a good "craic",
a good beer, amid good friends is the feeling that Irish pubs export. I'm told you can actually buy the
"Irish pub in a crate" from Guiness and they'll ship it anywhere in the world for you.


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Because of the huge success of Ryan Air, and airlines like Ryan Air, Dublin is a huge destination for "hen parties",
bachelor parties, and cheap weekend getaways. Here a few "hens" dressed up and are touring Temple Bar district.


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This place had an abundance of beer, three stories, and pretty good live music.


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I got Jeritt to pose by a sign that I thought my buddy Lane would enjoy.


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Here is Jeritt, ready for the night.


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Jeritt, after a long night for him.


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The next day, I decided to let Jeritt sleep in and so I went touring by myself to see the city. This
is the heart of the city, lined with the library where the modern Irish state was proclaimed, and more
tourist shops selling "Kiss me, I'm Irish" buttons than you could shake a stick at.


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The very nice, neoclassical, Heuston Train Station that we arrived at the night before.


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An old bridge over the river Liffy. It is the water under this bridge that feeds into the Guinness brewery,
even though they claim that the Guinness water source is somewhere in the Wicklow mountains.


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Here we see some of the brewery complex. It takes up about 16 or so square city blocks.


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Another bridge over the Liffy, this time from 1838 (but recently repainted).


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A great sign right near the brewery.


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One of the gates of the brewery (not St James' though). The story goes that every new year's night, a Guinness
painter comes out and repaints the present year so that when the city wakes up on Jan 1, the brewery is
ready for another year of service.


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I thought this was great. Although I understand that a facility as large as a brewery necessitates a medical department,
I just thought it was funny that this department is DIRECTLY across from the main tasting hall.


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This tower isn't phallic at all.


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If you can read the bottom of this sign, you can read Gaelic.


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It makes me laugh that the largest building in the downtown core of DUBLIN is a Heineken building.


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Church in downtown Dublin.


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It wasn't too tough to run into signs like this outside tourist shops.


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I took one of the double decker tour buses around the city to get a better view of the important sites.
This is obviously an important site.


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Some of the shopping district in Dublin.


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Old Gothic church in Dublin.


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Celtic cross on one of the roofs of the church.

Tour of Guinness Brewery


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The first portion of the Guinness Brewery tour discusses the raw materials used in the production
of Guinness beer. Barley is obviously an important ingredient.


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I took a lot of flak for repeating this statement from the Guinness people that hops only grows
in two regions of the world. It turns out that I should have read it closer. It says that hops
grows only between 35 and 55 degrees north latitude and then south of the equator. My bad.


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Yeast is another important ingredient in the production of beer. It's said that Arthur's yeast has been
cultivated from the same batch he brewed with. In nature, we'd call that inbreeding, but hey, the beer's good.


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More on hops.


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Water makes up the last ingredient. Another Dublin story has Arthur Guinness in the middle of a huge
water fight. When the city of Dublin called him out on how much water he was using, Arthur and some of the
brewery's people showed up with guns and pitchforks ready to defend their right to use all the water they wanted to.
This also led to one of the best business deals in history (more on this in a bit).


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Arthur Guinness, a Kildare man.


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Hmm, and I always thought roasting is what you did to colleagues when they retire.


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Engineers love flowcharts. Here, one describes the process to make Guinness beer.


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Here is something I didn't realize at all. Until 1959, all Guinness was from a bottle. So, those people
who tell you, "Oh yeah, the Irish have had it right forever. Yup, nothing like a pint of Guinness on tap"
are on crack. Guinness on tap is only new as of 1959.


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Engineers also like scale models, like this one of the St James Gate Brewery.


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More on Irish pubs.


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A brief history of the Guinness Book of Records, showing that great things can come from bar arguments,
in this case proving that the fastest game bird is the Canadian Long-Tailed Duck at 72 mph.


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A few books through the ages.


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Me, at the top of the Guinness Brewery, enjoying my "free" Guiness (actually the price of admission was $15).


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Outside the St James gate Brewery, Dublin, Ireland, 17 June, 2006.


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Going down in history as possibly the best business deal in history (maybe behind the purchase of Manhattan Island),
was Arthur Guinness' lease with the city of Dublin for 9000 years. The lease also granted Guinness water rights as well
meaning that he's free and clear to operate his brewery for many years to come. Interesting note: the largest Guinness
brewery in the world is actually in Africa!


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Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. I took a tour of the campus in the middle of a rain storm since at the time,
my friend Robin Speer was planning on doing his graduate work here.


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The original 15th century Gaelic harp, preserved at the library of the Trinity College, along with the Book of Kells.


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This is a shout out to my friend Des Bowes. She doesn't like empty statue holes. This is
an old bank building that was built during the age of the window tax.


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Great pet shop sign in an older part of town.


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This is a really important Gaelic football and hurling stadium in Dublin.


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Jeritt and I at Croke Park Stadium, Dublin, Ireland.


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A protective moat around the Stadium?


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A credit union in Dublin. See dad! There are socialists everywhere!


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The library where the Irish Declaration of Independence was read, therefore starting the Irish Revolution and pronouncing
the birth of the Republic.


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Forget Guinness, the Irish love Duff! (or at least the Simpsons).


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This is actually a Viking stone that marked the city of Dublin, placed here almost a 1000 years ago.


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St Anne's Church, Church of Ireland (Anglican) in Dublin. I loved the red doors.


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The smallest bar in Dublin, Ron Black's. Here, Jeritt is watching the World Cup.


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Dave Tobin, showing off the escape car. I think we had something like 12 people in here, and by a miracle
of luck, Dave managed to park it directly under the security cameras so that they couldn't see who was driving.
"Um, yes, I think it was those hooligans from England...".


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The always dazzling Claudio Troyano, playing some pieces from his latest CD.


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This is the ladies room at a bar called the Bank in Limerick, Ireland.


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Dave Tobin, launching a ball off the 15th tee, showing us all how to golf. Steve Ranta looks on.


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I didn't quite know what to say to this. A suggestion box in the middle of a lake. You'd almost think it's Bush's
suggestion box for his administration...

A great video showing the excellent sand-trap-excavation skills that Dave Tobin has - VIDEO

A video of Steve Ranta showing what he learned watching Dave Tobin - VIDEO

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