More pictures from the glaciers in Iceland, June 2006.


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The clouds and fog that followed me all day finally cleared up to show the Eyjafjallajökull (glacier).


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A great view of Skógafoss from the highway, with the glacier in view.


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One of the more beautiful pictures I took, with many purple lupins forming a nice foreground.


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How much of a mouthful is that last town? It means church-farm-convent.


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This was my first view of Vatnajokull glacier, the largest glacier in Iceland at 8400 km^2. It's almost 1 km thick
in places and is the 3rd largest icecap in the world (next to Greenland and Antarctica). The massive sand fields
are the result of under-glacier volcanic eruptions. What happens is the volcanoes go off under the ice and after enough
pressure builds, the entire glacier actually lifts up and lets out a boatload of water. This turns into a torrential flood
and totally wipes out everything in its path.


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This used to be a bridge span before the last big washout in the 70s.


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I stopped along the Ring Road to take pictures of Skaftafell National Park. This is the Skaftafelljokull glacier from the
Vatna. I'm standing in the middle of one of those sand fields, called sandur.


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I drove around the Vatna glacier and took some pictures from the southeast side.

Jökulsárlón glacial river lagoon


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One of the most amazing things I've ever seen in my life is above. That's the Vatna glacier that is slowly calving
icebergs that then float through this lagoon before heading out to sea. The opening scenes from the James Bond film
A View to a Kill were shot here. The lagoon is 200m deep and is the most crystal blue it's unreal.


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Jökulsárlón.


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Some of the colour and ice in the lagoon.


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Another view.


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The mountain range next to the lagoon looks like it would be good climbing, but the rock was chossy.
The amphibious boats here drive up on shore and pick up tourists to see the lagoon.


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View from a little higher up.


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Some of the tourists enjoying the view.


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Yours truly enjoying the great site here.


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You can see the icebergs floating out to sea here under a suspension bridge.

Video looking around the Jökulsárlón VIDEO


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I drove down to the water to see more ice up close.


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The sand along the water was black, as it is the result of volcanic rock eroding.

Skaftafell National Park


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I took the Ring Road back towards Reykjavik since I needed to have the car returned. On the way
back I spent some time hiking around Skaftafell National Park. This is a view of one of the toe glaciers
coming off the Vatnajokull. You could hear the ice groaning periodically.


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A glacier up close and personal.


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I've definitely gotten a few miles out of my Beyond Fleece jacket.


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Glacial Lake, Skaftafell National Park, Iceland, 27 June 2006.


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I thought the sky looked really blue here.



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The second Bjork sign I found in Iceland, this one just outside the town of Selfoss.


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Since there is so much hot water in this country, every town seems to have a fun pool to swim in. This is an awesome
sign at Reykjavik's Laugadalur city pool. The Icelandic people are very dedicated to cleanliness, more so even than
my girlfriend Natalia. I like how this sign specifically tells you where the city wants you to wash.

Northern Iceland, Myvatn, Akureyri


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I decided to hop a plane to see the northern parts of the country. This is the view from my plane down to the central
part of the country. I think this is actually Eiriksjokull (named after Erik Olson my buddy).


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Another icecap from the plane.


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The view from the tarmac in Akureyri, Iceland.


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Akureyri, Iceland. The town's name means meadow-sand-spit and the city is situated at the head of a long fjord.
From the city here, we're less than a stone's throw from the Arctic Circle.


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I took a bus tour of northeast Iceland and we stopped at Godafoss (God's falls). I like the spouting water from
the rock on the right side of the picture here.


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God's falls and I.


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As you can see, I was blessed with excellent weather while I was up north.


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I think people in North America are either dumber, or their governments are more liability-conscious. Have a look at the
complete lack of railing around the rocks here. Maybe we're just too dumb to stay out of harm's way.


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God's falls and I.

Myvatn area


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The next stop the bus made was around the Myvatn area. Myvatn means "midge", as in those little black flies
that absolutely drive you bananas. This is a picture of a pseudo-crater. All of the geologic features here
are from geothermal activity and this one is no different. When lava was flowing from the actual craters and into the
lake, it would cause the trapped water to boil and then erupt, leaving these cones and craters.


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Another pseudo-crater, this time in the middle of the lake. The midges I mention do actually attack in swarms
and most sane people rent bug nets. I'm not a sane man.


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Initially, you'll look at this picture and say, "Paul, why did you take a picture of a cow?" If you look closer,
you'll see something I had never seen before.



A cow bra. It turns out that cows here produce enormous quantities of milk and these devices keep the cow's milk bag
from dragging. I think I know a few women who could use one...


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The black castles in Dimmoborgir could get you lost for hours. Lava flowed across older lava fields and was dammed into a
molten lake. When the surface cooled, a domed roof formed, supported by pillars of igneous rock. When the dam burst,
the dome fell down, but the pillars remained. Check out the hole in the rock here.


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This looks like a guy talking.


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An extension of the previous mid-Atlantic fault runs north from the Alpingi through the Myvatn area
causing all kinds of havoc, including the major Krafla volcano, just north of here.


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I'm so well rounded, I have a foot in Europe and one in North America. And don't worry Mom, it only dropped a few
hundred feet below me.


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Mt Krafla erupted in 1724, leaving this explosion crater, called Viti, or 'hell'.


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Here I am in hell.

Hverarond Solfataras


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We stopped at Hverarond, which is a geothermal field. It's filled with steam vents, mud pots, suplhur
fumaroles, and boiling springs.


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One of the bubbling mud pots.


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Here is what is left when all of the mud boils off.

Video of steam vents and mud pots VIDEO


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Steam vents and I.


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Black bubbling mud.


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This was our tour guide for the bus tour next to a steam vent. If soil is lighter coloured, it means
it's HOT!


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In addition to having an amazing Blue Lagoon in the south, there is also a Blue Lagoon in the north.
We stopped in for a soak on the way home from Myvatn.


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There's the Icelandic flag flying proudly.


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I'll tell you, it's a tough way to spend a vacation. The water temp was ~ 40 deg C.


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I had never seen this strange square plane before. Erik Olson, any ideas?


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One last shout out to Erik Olson (and to Eric Lynn).

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