A run up Storm Mountain with Graham along with photos/videos of the boys
and a quick pop up Cox Hill as well.

First photos of the boys


Full size
When it's hot in Cochrane, I blow the pool up and the boys have a blast.

Video of the boys in the pool



Full size
Walter and his cousin Logan eating neapolitan ice cream.


Full size
I've now traded up from a trad rack to a mountain bike courtesy of my friend Dan. It's worked out so far
pretty well for me since I've used this bike in three different ways, connected to the Chariot, touring around
with Henry to the store, and also actually mountain biking the terrain around our house. All in all, more use
than I've had from my trad rack in years.


Full size
We took Henry to see the Avro Arrow 2 being built at 60 percent scale at Springback airport. He was more excited
about the lollipop, but he was quite pleased with the plane.


Full size
Henry and the plywood tail for now as they build it from fibreglass.


Full size
Drawings from the 50s of the Arrow.


Full size
Simulator you can fly of the Avro Arrow, which can climb at 12000 feet/minute! For more about the Avro Arrow
and its unique history, see HERE .


Pop up Cox Hill


Full size
I've been trying to work through the peaks in my backyard and this lunch outing was to go up Cox Hill.
It's ~15 km return but isn't that high off the Powderface Trail.


Full size
A look at some of the logging going on in the area with Belmore Browne Peak and Tiara Peak visible.


Full size
Considering it was dumping rain in Cochrane, I think this worked out pretty well.


Full size
Not a bad look at the Lougheed range along with the rest of the peaks to the west here.


Full size
Some of the awesome wild flowers in the area.


Full size
I think this might be a hedge nettle, but I'm still learning my treeline flowers.


Full size
The view back to Cochrane where it's dumping rain.

Garmin Connect data from the lunch outing Garmin Connect


Storm Mountain, finally


Full size
I'm always VERY happy to get time to spend with Graham getting rad in the mountains
After last year's ATTEMPT at Storm, we both felt we left something behind
and needed to rectify that. With a very early start (I left my house at 4:30am), we felt
that we'd have a good window to knock this bad boy down.


Full size
So, we corrected our mistake from last summer by going to the END of the meadow before turning up the slope.
Here's Graham on some of the scree and looking up at the dead-end at the end of the valley.


Full size
Graham thinks this is a gentian-family flower but it might be beards tongue or penstemon. One note
here though that Graham had me eat some nodding onion and it was delicious!


Full size
Looking back out the valley we just traveled up, with a nice view at Mt Storelk.


Full size
Nicer picture from Graham's camera.


Full size
There were gorgeous coral fossils all over this climb. These are a type of corral that is like a big tubule.
which I called out as being from the Devonian, and I might actually be right.


Full size
More tube-shaped coral with veins of quartz through the limestone.


Full size
A bit of a look at some of the scree here.


Full size
This is what we thought was the path up. It turns out it was to the left of this drainage and just following a
scree bed the whole way up.


Full size
Graham found a cool cave that had a welcoming bed of flowers for him.


Full size
I can't remember what flower Graham said this was.


Full size
Once we managed to stay on the scree slope, we slowly made our way up to the ridge. It's always
a bit harder to hike/scramble with this kind of a surface since the limestone slides on bedrock
right when you're going to take a step and weight it.


Full size
Graham with some cool rock formations on the ridge between Storm and Mist Mountain.


Full size
After gaining the ridge, it didn't seem too tough from there. It's hard to gauge steepness from
this shot, but it was not easy going for sure.


Full size
Our first look at the actual summit, with our eventual descent path in the next cut to the left
of the high point here.


Full size
My first look at the summit of Storm from the top of the scree bash.


Full size
A nice shot of Graham looking out to what we thought last year was Joffre with the glacier around it and after looking again
at the topo, I think that's a correct call.


Full size
Other neat corral fossils here.


Full size
Graham's look at really cool fossils.


Full size
A really large fossil near the top of the ridge of Storm. Most of the fossils in our area are all
sealife from when this was a huge ocean. They're not as cool as the trilobites from the Field area
but they're still REALLY cool.


Full size
After about three hard hours, we made it to the top of the ridge and only had a little bit left
to gain the summit, seen to Graham's right.


Full size
A cool look down towards the Sheep river valley, and looking back at the ridge between Storm and Mist Mountain.


Full size
Dropping to the other side of the ridge made this a bit easier to bypass the stiff ridge. We did find
a bit of snow, and it's definitely AIRY to Graham's right side and down.


Full size
I'm pointing out some snow with the summit visible behind me.


Full size
'To Infinity and Beyond!'


Full size
A bit of going 'au cheval' on the ridge.


Full size
On the summit ridge. We climbed some of this right on the ridge, and some of it just below either side.


Full size
This takes more balance than I wanted to use that day, so we dropped to the right.


Full size
A neat shot of Graham showing the drop to the Sheep valley.


Full size
Stepping through a short scramble section to the other side of the ridge. A nice look back towards Mist Mountain from here.


Full size
Looking back down the descent drainage all the way to the highway and our car. I didn't take any photos of
Graham's little 5.x smear routine near here as I was spotting him instead.


Full size
Looking back at the scary look of Mist Mountain.


Full size
Nice panoramic looking back at Mt Joffree and the Highwood Pass area to the Elk Range.

View from the summit of Storm



Full size
The descent from Storm was supposed to be a 'quick, direct descent'. Well, the direct part is
definitely correct, but the quick part is only true if you have either a death wish or a parasail
since it was aggressive downsloping slabs and scree to cliffs.

Graham riding the scree



Full size
A look back up some of the scree we just came down. It was actually pretty similar to the Mt Rae exit from the
ridge there as well, but much longer, and much steeper. You can see Graham working his way down the slab on the right.


Full size
A look at the descent path.


Full size
A look at Mt Storelhk, a climb Graham has done but I haven't.


Full size
A look at some of this descent.


Full size
Really cool rock formations as the layers compress and squeeze together.


Full size
Looking back at the descent. Even after making through the slabs and the cliff bands, there was still a significant
amount of scree bash that didn't really ski at all here. Really pretty day and great weather though - you wouldn't
want to do this in a rain storm for sure.


Full size
Graham wasn't a fan of this exit. Take the high point on the left with the double bump and basically mark a line
down the centre of this to the right of the wet mark. Yeah, it was something.


Full size
In a meadow finally feeling safe enough to remove my helmet.


Full size
On the drive home, I saw some sheep blocking the road.


Full size
Sheep and babies cruising by my car.


Full size
Babies and rams.

Garmin Connect data from our trip up Storm Mountain: Garmin Connect


Full size
As you can see, the 'Ultratrac' setting doesn't work great in the mountains but the regular GPS
burns about ~10% of battery an hour. Maybe I should just suck it up.

Return to picture index